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Vermont Korean War Veterans - November 2013

Wesley Chandler sits while waiting for the start of an awards ceremony being held at the state house in Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 12, 2013. Chandler was one of 28 Vermonters to receive an award from the Republic of Korea, for his service during the Korean War. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Mattison)
Bruce Cram accepts his medal from the Republic of Korea in honor of his fallen comrade, Lt. Francis W. Escott, in Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 12, 2013. Escott was a pilot with the 158th Fighter Wing, Vermont Air National Guard, and was shot down during his 58th flying mission and taken prisoner. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Mattison)
U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Steven Cray congratulates Fred Newhall during an awards ceremony being held at the state house in Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 12, 2013. Newhall was one of 28 Vermonters to receive an award from the Republic of Korea, for his service during the Korean War. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Mattison)
Members of the Vermont Army and Air National Guard post the colors during an awards ceremony in Montpelier, Vt., Nov. 12, 2013. Thirty-seven Vermont veterans were being honored in a ceremony for their service to their county. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Mattison)

As a result of WWII, the Korean peninsula was separated at the 38th Parallel with the North being occupied and supported by the Soviet Union and its allies, and the South, occupied by the United States and its allies.

This war started when the North Koreans crossed the 38th parallel and invaded South Korea. Active hostilities took place from June 25, 1950, to July 27, 1953, but to date, no formal peace treaty has been signed. Initially fought between the North and South Koreans for control of the Korean peninsula, it eventually escalated into what was considered by many to be a proxy war between the United States and its allies and the Chinese and Russian communist regimes.

This conflict was often called a "policing action," mainly to bypass the need for Congress to present an official "declaration of war." Many Americans, and especially American Veterans of the Korean War, consider this to be the "forgotten war" because it is seldom referred to as a major conflict by historians.

For a list of Vermonters, by town, who died in the Korean War click on this link which will take you to the National Archives site.